Pussy Riot

A feminist punk-rock band formed in August 2011 named Pussy Riot made headlines with their guerrilla performances in unusual places voicing their opinion about feminism, LGBT rights, and opposition to the Russian President Vladimir Putin. After performing in Moscow’s Cathedral of Christ the Savior, 5 members of the group protested their rage against the Orthodox Church for supporting Putin.

So how does this apply to the idea of mediated mobilization?

When news spread about the women who were arrested for “hooliganism motivated by religious hatred” and after the women’s sentences for two years of imprisonment  protests were being held around the world including Amnesty International who declared a “Pussy Riot Global Day” for activists. In New York City people gathered and read statements by the convicted members, In Bulgaria people put on masks similar to those worn by Pussy Riot Protests were held around the world after the sentence was announced. All around the world people gathered and supported the ladies of Pussy Riot starting a “Free Pussy Riot” campaign. The women of Pussy Riot fearlessly spoke out against Russian rule and in one hot minute, everyone around the world gathered around in honor and support of the three women arrested for voicing their opinion. Watch this video: 

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One thought on “Pussy Riot

  1. I found this really interesting because I had to read two articles about this group for my Journalism class! I think it is so crazy how all of this happened and how the group was put in prison and people protested it. It really spoke out.

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